Challenge Your Gardening Status Quo with 5 Bulb Recipes

Posted by Green Acres Nursery & Supply on Oct 25, 2016 12:04:21 PM

Every spring and fall bulbs arrive, and not to brag, but we've been told by our bulb suppliers that we have the most extensive bulb selection on the West Coast. Right in your own backyard, Sacramento.    

Bulbs...they are lumpy, bumpy, and downright ugly sometimes. But once planted under six inches of soil, add a little water, sunshine, and time, these bulbs turn into something magical. The flowers grown from bulbs brighten your garden and your spirits to let you know spring is on its way. 

If you are a novice gardener, you may not know there are two seasons to plant bulbs. First, fall bulb planting season is the end of August- November. If planted correctly, fall bulbs will bloom in late winter or early Spring. And, they are the most popular, probably because they include very recognizable varities like Tulips, Daffodils & Irises. Secondly, spring bulbs are planted in late winter and bloom in early summer.     

daydream_tulip_from_the_biking_gardener-783626-edited.jpgLet's talk fall bulbs in three settings. Once you choose your desired setting, you can pick one of our bulb recipes for a perfect fall planting weekend project.

Settings:

  • Plant bulbs in a container and plant winter annuals right on top of the bulbs. That way, you don't have to stare at bare soil for five months. As the plants emerge, they will compliment the colorful annuals and create a beautiful bouquet-filled container.
  • Plant bulbs within your borders, or intermixed with other perennials and shrubs for added color in spring.
  • Planting a container of 100% bulbs. You could tuck this container out of the way until they start blooming.  

 


Bulb Recipes

1. 'Daydream' Hybrid Tulips + Forget-me-nots

Hybrid tulips are the tallest and largest flowering tulips.  Best for cutting! The 'Daydream' Tulip opens yellow to orange. It pairs incredibly well with the vibrant blue of Forget-me-nots. With Hybrid Tulips, they need to be chilled in order to bloom. In our mild climate, it doesn't get cold enough for long enough, so pop these in the fridge for six weeks before planting.

2. 'Blue Parrot' Tulip + Purple Violas

Parrot Tulips are known for their spectacular ruffled and feathery edges. The 'Blue Parrot' tulip has mauve-ish blue flowers and 18" long stems. Try planting bulbs shoulder to shoulder in a 16-18" pot. Or plant them with a little more space in between and then plant those purple violas right on top! Come spring, your container will beshutterstock_187005626 red white tulip muscari pot container CUST-299504-edited.jpg overflowing with blooms.

3. Narcissus 'Salome' + Frostkiss 'Penny's Pink' Hellebore

Narcissus (Daffodil) 'Salome' is in one of the most popular classes of daffodils because of it's large, vibrant center cups. Narcissus is a welcome addition to borders, beds, containers, rock gardens, under deciduous trees and natural areas in the landscape. It's recommended to plant in groupings of at least six bulbs together to make an impact. Plant near a front door with a grouping of Narcissus 'Salome' with Frostkiss 'Penny's Pink' Hellebore for a stunning combination.

4. White Ranunculus + White Tulips + Grape Hyacinth

We got the recipe inspiration from wedding bouquets. There is something so pristine and fresh about pairing these flowers together. If mixing in a border, be sure to plan the Tulips in the back, the Ranunculus in the middle and the Grape Hyacinth (Muscari) in the foreground. You won't be disappointed with this recipe, especially if you like to cut for indoor bouquets.

shutterstock_424547380 daffodil tete bike tulip CUST-679284-edited.jpg5. 'Earl of Essex' Bearded Iris + Columbine + Lupine

The 'Early of Essex' Bearded Iris considered a "tall" Bearded Iris and is actually reblooming. Fun, right!? It's clean white petals are veined on the edges with violet markings and have a gentle and slight ruffling. Plant Columbine and Lupine next to your Bearded Iris for a look that is very much akin to being in a natural woodland setting. We love all the textures involved! This planting recipe would be best for a garden border.

These different recipes can be a jumping-off point for you to get out of the gardening rut of planting the same old things each year. Expand your horizons, grow as a gardener, and plant some bulbs this fall. A special thank you to Sunset Western Garden for bulb recipe inspiration.

 



Start your bulb garden this fall and when you least expect it...in the middle of winter these little bulbs with brighten up your garden and be a ray of sunshine for all who see them. Visit any of our store locations in Sacramento for hands-on help choosing bulbs. Happy planting!

 

Geek out on specific plant information for Irises, Tulips & Daffodils!

More About Bulbs  

Photo Credit: 'Daydream' Tulip from The Biking Gardener I  thebikinggardener.com 


 

Topics: Flowers, Cut Flower Garden, Bulbs, planting recipes, fall planting

Our Favorite Bulb Companions

Posted by Green Acres Nursery & Supply on Sep 14, 2016 4:07:17 PM

bulb_mix-1.jpgFall bulbs are the best investment you can make in your garden now, for colorful beds next spring. You don't need to dig a huge hole to plant them, and many varieties will naturalize in your garden and come back, putting on a more impressive show of flowers each year.

Try some of our favorite spring-blooming bulbs, and mix with companion plants that will make your bulbs stand out. 

Iris_Bearded_Spirit_Mountain-840764-edited.jpgIrises

A rhizome that gives way to a clump of blue-green narrow foliage about two feet high and wide. Irises come in many shapes and sizes, and will naturalize well in our climate, gradually spreading each year. Every few years they need to be divided to flower vigorously year after year. Click here to learn more about the Bearded Iris varieties we carry. 

Colorful Companion Plants: Ornamental Grasses, California Poppies, Yellow Violas.

 

 

 

Tulips-1-979022-edited.jpgTulips

A classic bulb which forms a narrow clump of blue-green foliage topped with cheerful cup-like flowers in the spring. Tulips require six to eight weeks of refrigeration before planting. The refrigeration simulates the winter dormancy that they would endure in their native climate. Tulips to not naturalize here, and are treated as an annual. For the best results, plant them en masse in groups of 12 or more. 

Colorful Companion Plants: Shasta Daisies, Forget-Me-Nots, Wallflower.

 

 

 

Daffodil_Pink_Pride-099005-edited.jpgDaffodils

The bright green strap-like foliage of this fall bulb is usually the first to pop up in the spring. Daffodils bear bright daisy-like flowers with a single cylindrical petal in the center called a corona. They can be white, yellow, peach, cream or many combinations thereof, and they are one of the most reliable bulbs to grow in the Sacramento Area. Daffodils will naturalize easily in your garden, putting on a more impressive display every year. 

Colorful Companion Plants: Delphinium, Ornamental Kale, Grape Hyacinth.

Bulb Planting Tip: The bulbs we carry come in packaging that takes the guess work out of planting; follow the simple instructions to know just how deep to plant, and the best distance and positioning. 

 

 

Topics: Bulbs, Fall, Perennials

Our Plant Pick-of-the-Week: Crocosmia

Posted by Green Acres Nursery & Supply on Aug 10, 2015 8:55:11 AM

Our Plant Pick-of-the-Week: Crocosmia

Crocosmia1-780107-edited

Crocosmia is a perennial from corm (an underground structure like a bulb) which forms an upright clump of bright green sword-like foliage. In summer, this clump is adorned by tall stalks bearing an inflorescence of funnel-shaped flowers that are adored by hummingbirds. The flowers have a tropical feel, but the plant has incredible cold hardiness, tolerating temperatures as low as -20°F.  It offers all the beauty of a bulb such as Gladiolas, but it's foliage stays relatively neat and tidy spring through fall, making this perennial well-suited to any cut-flower garden or perennial border. 

Crissacrocosmia-639873-edited

 

Reaching about 2-3' tall, Crocosmia will slowly spread over time, resulting in a more impressive show of flowers year after year. Plus, you can divide them in the fall and plant them in other places; it's the plant that keeps on giving!

It's Crissa's pick-of-the-week because:

"The flowers are brilliant and showy. Hummingbirds love them and they're easy to grow!"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more flowers well-suited for bouquets, check out  Grow a Cut Flower Garden

Topics: Cut Flower Garden, Hummingbirds, Bulbs

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