Citrus: Winter Sunshine for Sacramento

Posted by Green Acres Nursery & Supply on Nov 30, 2016 3:21:06 PM

Winter's here, which means saying goodbye to the sunshine for awhile, but that's no reason to feel sad! Citrus is in its prime now, and anyone who has grown their own Citrus can tell you that first, sweet, tart bite is the closest thing you'll find to sunshine in the winter time. 

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Dwarf vs. Standard 
We primarily stock dwarf Citrus because they're easier to maintain at 8-12' tall than standard varieties. The quality and size of the fruit is exactly the same, the difference is the trees have been grafted onto dwarfing rootstock, preventing them from reaching the standard size of 30'.  Always wanted to grow Citrus in containers? Dwarf varieties are the way to go!

Did you know that Citrus is one of the few fruits that produces nearly year 'round? Depending on the variety, you can harvest anytime and there are plenty of varieties to choose from!

Here are some of our favorites*

Sweet Orange

Cara Cara Pink Navel 
Usual Fruit Season: Fall/Winter
This early-ripening navel orange has unusual pink-tinged flesh and a rich, sweet flavor. 
Washington Navel
Usual Fruit Season: Winter
California's famous winter-ripening orange. Sweet, seedless fruit ripens ten months from its bloom time in Spring. 

Lemon

Improved Meyer 
Usual Fruit Season: Fall/Spring
This hybrid is a cross between a lemon and a mandarin, improved by Four Winds Growers in the 1950's. The result is a slightly sweet, fragrant, thin-skinned fruit which is favored among gourmet chefs. 

Eureka
Usual Fruit Season: Fall/Spring
A traditional tart lemon that bears large fruit with thick skin and a bright, piquant flavor. Once established, it can produce fruit year 'round. 

 

Mandarin

Clementine
Usual Fruit Season: Winter
Also known as Algerian Mandarin, Clementines are a sweet, slightly tart, seedless variety. They were discovered by French missionary Marie-Clément Rodier in North Africa over 100 years ago.

Fun Fact: Cuties® Mandarins found in supermarkets come from two varieties: W. Murcott (late winter-early spring) and Clementines (fall-winter). 

 

Owari Satsuma
Usual Fruit Season: Dec/Jan
One of the hardiest varieties, Satsumas are coveted for their juicy, sweet, seedless fruit in an easy-to-peel package. This variety is popular for canning, the fruit has a rich, intense flavor. 

 

 

 

 

Clementine, Mandarin, Tangerine...What's the Difference? Clementines and Tangerines are varieties of Mandarins, and the names are often used interchangeably. Clementines are very sweet, seedless and easy-to-peel.  Tangerines are slightly more tart, and usually have seeds. 

Lime

Bearss Seedless
Usual Fruit Season: Fall
True lime with classic tart flavor, green rind and flesh. Produces larger fruit than Mexican lime, nearly year 'round. 

Mexican/Key
Usual Fruit Season: Fall
Small rounded fruit has a complex tropical flavor, which adds exciting tang to drinks and desserts. This variety is especially tender, be sure to protect from frost.


If you are lucky enough to already have one of these delicious fruit trees in your yard, be sure to protect them from frost in the chilly months ahead! Learn more below...

Frost Cloth Guide

 *Selection varies throughout the season, call one of our five locations for current availability. 

Topics: Winter, Fruit Trees, Citrus

Unique Houseplant Projects

Posted by Green Acres Nursery & Supply on Nov 22, 2016 11:49:32 AM

Gardening becomes a bit of a challenge in the winter months. The plants are dormant, the weather is chilly and the soil is unworkable. Whatever is a plant nerd to do? Indoor gardening of course!

 

Here are some of our favorite fun houseplant projects to keep the winter blues at bay. 


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Tillandsia (Air Plants)

Unusual, easy, eye-catching, these are all words to describe the air plant. Although they look more like aliens than plants, they are actually epiphytes native to South America.

Design Tip

The best part about Tillandsia* is their versatility, they can be suspended like ornaments, encapsulated in glass globes or nestled into a festive centerpiece. The possibilities are endless!

Learn More About Tillandsia 

 

 

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Bonsai

The word "Bonsai" in Japanese literally translates "tray planting", so almost anything can be a bonsai. It's the art of dwarfing a plant in a small container, and maintaining it through careful pruning, watering and fertilizing. 

Design Tip

For a festive winter centerpiece, try decorating an evergreen bonsai with ornaments, like the Christmas tree pictured, courtesy of the Sacramento Bonsai Club

 

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Succulents 

Succulents lend themselves well to miniature gardens because they root easily from cuttings; just break off a piece, plop it in a pot with E.B. Stone Cactus Mix, water, and wait. Succulents are best in bright light (within four feet of a window) and after the initial planting, water them only when the soil is dry to the touch.

Design Tip

Succulents make beautiful "living walls" - simply stick cuttings into a vertical surface with a medium like moss, secure using wire and mist occasionally. 

 

 

 

fairy_garden_supplies-830079-edited.jpgFairy Gardening

Fairy gardening is a catch-all term for crafting a tiny landscape with an enchanting fantasy feel. In many ways it's similar to bonsai, you're seeking to create a garden in a confined space, and the limit is your imagination. Accessories like the mushrooms pictured help define your fairy garden, so be sure to stop by our Garden Décor* section. 

 

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Design Tip

Don't just fall for flowers, there are many petite foliage plants that look quite charming nestled into a terrarium or container garden. 

Learn More About Fairy Gardens 

* Not available at our Sacramento location. 

Curious about more creative ways to bring the outdoors in this winter?

Check out our  DIY Inspiration




Topics: Winter, Air Plants, Airplants, Tillandsia, Decorating, Pot-Ups, Succulents

Our Plant Pick: Camellias

Posted by Green Acres Nursery & Supply on Nov 10, 2016 10:11:24 AM

Our Plant Pick: Camellias

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Camellias are a hardy evergreen shrub native to eastern and southern Asia. They have a long history of cultivation there, as the leaves of one species - Camellia sinensis - are harvested to produce tea. Ornamental varieties such as the Japanese (Camellia japonica) and Sun (Camellia sasanqua) are commonly found in the United States, although there is nothing common about the beauty and diversity offered by this flowering shrub. 

GA_FOL_Janet-Camellia-s-WEB-658155-edited.jpgCamellia flowers come in six forms: anemone, formal double, peony, rose-form double, semi-double and single. These flowers come in white, pink, red or a combination thereof resulting in dozens of unique varieties. Sacramento is the Camellia Capital of the World, if you walk around the grid this winter you may be graced by the sight of 15-foot-tall camellia shrubs in bloom, some of them over 100 years old.

Despite their delicate appearance, Camellias are actually very resilient. They thrive in our climate when planted in rich, acidic soil with afternoon shade. Starting in late summer, fertilize with a low nitrogen fertilizer such as E.B. Stone Ultra Bloom to encourage cold hardiness and maximum flowering. Clean up flowers that have fallen to reduce your risk of petal blight, a fungal disease which causes rust-colored spots on petals. After bloom, prune to shape and fertilize again with E.B. Stone Azalea & Camellia food. 

Janet's plant pick is Camellias because:

"The sasanqua varieties start blooming in the fall, and then the japonicas go all the way through spring, keeping color in the garden all winter long."

Are you looking to keep your garden colorful this season? Check out some cool-season container ideas  Winter Container Ideas

 

Topics: Fall Shrubs, Winter, Flowers, Shrubs, Planting Ideas, Flowers for Shade, Camellias

Four Reasons to Grow Veggies this Fall

Posted by Green Acres Nursery & Supply on Oct 5, 2016 5:40:57 PM


lettuce2.jpgSacramento is blessed with long, hot summers and mild, temperate winters, meaning we can grow our own year 'round. 

However, most home gardeners forget about the delicious, nutritious and hardy vegetables which thrive when the temperatures drop.

Here are four compelling reasons to give cool-season veggies a try this fall!

 

 

Keep The Beds Clean 
Rather than letting your vegetable beds become overrun with weeds throughout the winter, try planting cool-season crops! If you are selective about crop-rotation, the quality of your soil can actually be improved by continuing to grow veggies during the winter months. Click the button below to learn more about how to rotate your crops to maximize your yield. 

Crop Rotation 101

They're Easy Peasy 
Cooler temperatures means fewer pests, making it easier to maintain your garden organically. Slugs and Snails are usually the biggest culprit for crop damage in the winter, and they can be easily controlled by lining your beds or containers with copper tape. You'll find copper tape in the Garden Solutions department of any Green Acres Nursery & Supply. 

Nutritious & Delicious
Leafy greens such as Kale, Swiss Chard and Spinach are high in vitamins and antioxidants, boosting your immunity through the cold & flu season. Cruciferous vegetables such as Broccoli, Cabbage and Brussel Sprouts contain a substance called glucosinolates, which have been found to reduce your risk for certain types of cancer. 

Fewer Food Miles 
Food miles are the distance that your food has traveled to get to you. By buying your veggies plants from your local nursery and growing them in your backyard, you are reducing the environmental impact of fuel consumption caused by transporting food long distances (AKA your "carbon footprint")

Green Acres Nursery & Supply sources all of our vegetables from local growers such as Eisley's Nursery in Auburn, Kawahara Nurseries in Morgan Hill and Fredriks Nursery in Ripon. By sourcing our vegetable starters locally, we are:

  • Helping sustain fellow independent nurseries in our local economy
  • Providing you with plants that are well-acclimated to the area
  • Ensuring that your veggie starters are fresh, giving them a head start in your garden

Ready to start growing your own?

Here's a list of what vegetables you can plant when for the Sacramento Area:

Veggie Calendar

Topics: What Can I Plant This Season?, Winter, Edibles, Veggies and Herbs, Fall Veggies, IPM, Fall

Our Plant Pick: Maejima Winter Daphne

Posted by Green Acres Nursery & Supply on Mar 7, 2016 1:27:03 PM

Our Plant Pick: Maejima Winter Daphne 

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Maejima Winter Daphne (Daphne odora 'Maejima') is an evergreen shrub which forms a mound of glossy green foliage rimmed with gold. It has an upright, somewhat open growth habit, reaching about three to four feet high and wide with little pruning needed. It's an underrated problem-solving plant, which tolerates dry shade, is deer resistant and can withstand temperatures all the way down to 0°F. 

MelinaDaphne-272309-edited.jpgPerhaps the most enchanting attribute of this overachieving evergreen is its bloom. In late winter or early spring, clusters of deep pink buds open to reveal highly fragrant white flowers. The flowers may be small, but the fragrance carries- a sweet-spicy perfume reminiscent of ginger and citrus. Requiring afternoon shade and slightly acidic soil, Daphne make nice informal hedges, or even specimen plants in a container. Nestle one in your garden where you can walk past it occasionally and appreciate it's invigorating fragrance announcing the arrival of spring.

It's Melina's plant pick because:

"It looks great year 'round, and the flowers smell phenomenal."

 

Considering re-doing your yard with low water plants? 

Drought Tolerant Plants

 

Topics: Waterwise, Fragrant Plants, Winter, Shrubs, Deer Resistant, Drought Tolerant, Low maintenance

Pruning 101

Posted by Green Acres Nursery & Supply on Feb 4, 2016 9:57:15 AM

pruning_woody_plants-resized-600-011342-edited.jpgPruning is the act of selectively trimming plant material in order to direct growth. This is done to promote better flowering or fruiting, accentuate a plants natural form or increase it's vigor. Everyone who gardens will eventually utilize pruning to maintain their plants health or appearance, so if you're uncertain about how to prune a specific plant visit one of our five locations and let us walk you through the process. 

The right tools are key to the pruning process. 

Here are our recommendations: 
Prune Like a Pro

When is the best time to prune?

For the majority of plants, the best time to prune is in late winter to early spring. This is because a dormant plant is less likely to have a stress reaction to the removal of limbs and foliage. 

It's better to prune towards the end of the dormant season because:

  • Dense branches can help insulate a plant from frost damage, so you want to leave them on during the coldest parts of winter 
  • Late winter is right before new growth happens in spring, so a plant is ready to close off the wound as quickly as possible when it starts growing as soon as the weather warms up
  • Deciduous plants have no leaves, so it's easier to see their natural forms and access the branches which need to be pruned

Fruit trees, roses, perennials (such as lavender and sage), grasses and most shrubs are pruned at this time of year. Fruit trees and roses can be pruned in several different ways depending on their type, age and desired use. 

Click the link below for tips on pruning roses:

Pruning Roses

Click the link below for tips on pruning fruit trees for the home gardener:

Backyard Orchard Culture

There are some exceptions to the rule, some plants should not be pruned in late winter to early spring.

The following categories of plants should be pruned at different times of year:

  • Apricots and cherries are susceptible to fungal and bacterial infections, and open pruning wounds in cooler weather can exasperate the issue. They should both be pruned after fruiting in late summer or fall. 
  • Trees, shrubs and vines which bloom in spring are blooming on old wood, meaning wood that developed the previous year. As a general rule, any shrub or tree which blooms in spring should be pruned shortly after they've finished blooming. 
  • Hydrangeas- if you have an everblooming variety of Hydrangea such as the 'Endless Summer'® or 'Let's Dance'® series, they can be pruned throughout the year. The varieties which bloom annually shouldn't be pruned after mid-August. 

What types of pruning cuts are there?

Heading: Heading cuts prune away the tip of a branch, or it's terminal shoot. This is usually done to stop a branch from growing longer, and encourage bushy growth from lateral shoots. A heading cut on the main leader of a tree, is known as topping. Topping will stunt the tree from growing taller, and is not generally recommended. 

Blueberry_pruning-resized-600.jpgThinning: Thinning cuts (pictured) are where you select a lateral branch you would like to shorten, trace it back to it's point of origin, and cutting it off there. Thinning reduces size while maintaining a plant's natural form–ideal for pruning Japanese Maples. For plants which send up branches in a clumping pattern directly from the ground, the branch is traced back and cut at ground level. 

Shearing: Shearing is a type of pruning in which a lot of small branches are cut with "heading" cuts all at once, usually flush to the same level vertically or horizontally. Shearing encourages dense, uniform lateral growth for a neat and trimmed form–typically to maintain hedges and topiaries.

Note: Whenever shearing a hedge, always shear it at a slight angle like a pyramid, where the base is wider than the top, so that the top of the hedge doesn't cast shade and prevent light from reaching the lower branches. 

Pinching: Pinching is a way of preventing a bud from developing into a branch or flower. It is generally only done to new growth or herbaceous plants, anything soft enough to be severed with your fingers. This method is good for directing growth of young plants, and preventing flowering or fruiting. 

Topics: Winter, Tree, Shrubs, Pruning, Roses, Fruit Trees, Japanese Maples, Perennials

Bareroot Basics

Posted by Green Acres Nursery & Supply on Dec 28, 2015 9:28:59 AM

Bareroot season is here, and it's the best time of year to select and plant the perfect variety of rose, fruit tree or rare edibles for your garden. 

What is bareroot?

Bareroot_Behind_the_Scenes_1-762515-edited.jpgBareroot nursery stock is plants that have been grown on farms in the field, dug up, and then transferred to nurseries to sell. At Green Acres Nursery & Supply, we pot-up our bareroot plants in fiber pulp pots, which helps protect the roots and lengthens the season that they're available to you. 

What is the benefit of buying bareroot?

  • Quality: because they're dormant when dug up, there is minimal damage inflicted on the roots. Planting them in the cool season allows them to get established so they are ready to take off come spring. 
  • Price: bareroot plants require less care to maintain in the nursery, so we receive them at a lower cost and share the savings with you. 
  • Selection: bareroot season also offers the widest selection of roses and fruit trees at the lowest prices of the year. Whether you're a beginner just looking to get started, or a seasoned gardener searching for that special unique variety, now is the time to buy!
  • Seasonality: Certain plants and unusual varieties are only available this time of year. For example, rhubarb and horseradish are sold almost exclusively in bareroot form. 

Roses

With over 50 varieties of Hybrid Tea, Grandiflora, Floribunda and Climbing roses to choose from, now is by far the best time to find that special rose you have your heart set on, or to fall in love with a new one! 

Download Our Bareroot Roses List

Need a few pointers on rose care? Check out our Growing Roses blog.

  Growing Roses

Fruit Trees

Dave Wilson Nursery has been the local expert in growing fruit trees for over 50 years. With their extensive selection of tried-and-true fruit trees with new and exciting varieties available every year, you're sure to find the right tree for your family. 

Want to grow your own, but you're not sure how to start? 

Backyard Orchard Culture

Strawberries

Locally sourced, fantastically flavored strawberries. Plant now for a fruitful spring.

Choose from:

  • Eversweet: everbearing variety produces sweet, conical fruit spring through fall. Ideal choice for warmer climates. 
  • Quinault: everbearing variety produces large, soft and sweet fruit, ideal for preserving and eating fresh. Produces late spring through fall. 

 

Other Tasty Bareroot Treats

  • Asparagus: perennial vegetable which requires partial shade in our climate. Once planted, it cannot be moved so find a permanent home for it. Asparagus requires several years of growth before first harvest, but your patience will be rewarded. 
  • Horseradish: very vigorous and easy to grow plant, requires about a year's worth of growth before first harvest. Horseradish thrives in rich soil. 
  • Rhubarb: delicious, edible, and attractive enough to earn a place in your ornamental garden. Rhubarb requires several years of growth before harvest, and afternoon shade in our climate. Harvest by pulling stalks sideways, never removing all the stalks from a single plant at once. Leaves are poisonous, ingest stalks only. 

Learn How To Grow Rhubarb, Horseradish and Asparagus 

Topics: Winter, Edibles, Roses, Grandiflora, Floribunda, Rhubarb, Strawberries, Asparagus, Horseradish

Our Plant Pick-of-the-Week: Lenten Rose

Posted by Green Acres Nursery & Supply on Dec 14, 2015 9:46:55 AM

Our Plant Pick-of-the-Week: Lenten Rose

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Lenten Rose (Helleborus spp.) is an evergreen perennial for shade which forms a clump of leathery dark green foliage. Starting in late winter and continuing through early spring; stalks bearing many daisy-like flowers bloom. What appear to be petals are actually bracts, which are long-lasting and sturdy enough to stand up to the freezing cold nights. If that weren't impressive enough, they are also water wise which makes them great for planting near natives such as Oak trees. 

Cathie_Helleborus-046409-edited.jpgMaintaining a compact 1-2 feet high a wide, Lenten Rose are often sold as centerpieces for the holidays, though they are sturdy enough to withstand temperatures as low as 20°F. The most common variety is white, but they can sometimes be found in unusual colors such as purple, yellow, pink and green. 

They're Cathie's pick-of-the-week because:

"They do well in shade, in dry conditions, tolerate hard frost and deer. Not to mention they bloom in the dead of winter, providing your garden with year-round interest. "

 

  

Interested in centerpiece-ready plants for the holidays? 

Gift Ideas for Gardeners

 

Topics: Waterwise, Winter, Deer Resistant, Drought Tolerant

Great Gift Ideas for Gardeners

Posted by Green Acres Nursery & Supply on Dec 10, 2015 2:40:56 PM

Chances are you know a few people who love to spend time in the garden. There may not be a whole lot of yard work to do right now, but there is plenty of fun gift ideas at Green Acres Nursery & Supply!

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Roses

Do you know a gardener that is passionate about roses? Make sure you give them all they need to thrive. Mid-December through Mid-February is the best time to prune roses in our climate.

We carry everything you need for rose pruning, plus a great selection of packaged bareroot roses available in stores now! Choose from a wide variety of Hybrid Tea, Grandiflora, Floribunda and Climbing Roses. 

Packaged Bareroot Rose Varieties

 

 

 

 

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Grills

What about that special person who loves outdoor entertaining? Green Acres Nursery & Supply Outdoor Living is your destination for grills in Elk Grove, Folsom, and Rocklin. We carry a great selection of barbecues from trusted brands such as Big Green Egg and Weber. The Big Green Egg package is a great deal, available in several sizes and comes with everything you, or your favorite grill master, need to get grillin'. Check out our gallery of grills

 

  

Houseplants & Accessories

The holidays give us many opportunities to visit with our loved ones. Don't show up to a party empty-handed! Check out some of these beautiful gifts for your favorite host or hostess:

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Christmas Cactus

The Christmas Cactus is a fountain-shaped succulent which bears beautiful pink flowers right around Christmas time. Its graceful weeping forms, drought tolerance and reliable bloom make it a great houseplant year-round. 

 Varieties may vary at each location.

 

 

 

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Hand-Painted Pottery*

This pottery and statuary is bright, colorful, and sure to liven up a patio or flower bed. Hand-painted in Mexico, each piece is one-of-a-kind, and sure to perfectly accentuate your next fiesta. 

 *Available at Elk Grove, Folsom, Rocklin and Roseville.

 

 

 

 

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Tillandsia Wreath**

What about a wreath that is still stylish even after the holidays? This one, made of woven grapevine and topped with a bow is bearing Tillandsia (Air Plants), an unusual type of eye-catching houseplant which requires very little maintenance to thrive. 

 

 *Available at Elk Grove, Folsom, Rocklin and Roseville.

 

 

 

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Amaryllis Centerpiece

There's no going wrong with Amaryllis, a bulb which can be "forced" to bloom indoors to create a stunning living centerpiece. Simply set in a container lined with decorative pebbles, add some water and watch the stalk shoot up to reveal huge trumpet-shaped flowers that are sure to impress guests. In a hurry? We have pre-potted Amaryllis bulbs ready for any occasion.

Growing Bulbs Indoors 

 

 

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If you just can't decide, go for the gold with a Green Acres gift card! Available in any amount. 

Topics: Gift Ideas, Winter, Holiday Decor, Seasonal Items, BBQ, Outdoor Entertaining, Houseplants, Roses, Airplants, Tillandsia, Big Green Egg, Grilling, Christmas, Grills, Grandiflora, Floribunda, Climbing Rose, Rose Care, Hybrid Tea Rose

Our Plant Pick-of-the-Week: Wintercreeper

Posted by Green Acres Nursery & Supply on Dec 4, 2015 5:19:42 PM

Our Plant Pick-of-the-Week: Wintercreeper

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Emerald and Gold Wintercreeper (Euonymus fortunei 'Emerald & Gold') is an evergreen shrub with a mounding, slightly rambling, and sometimes climbing growth habit. The variety pictured bears deep green foliage rimmed with gold, and its sister variety 'Emerald Gaiety' has cool, cream and mint green leaves. Both varieties take on a rosy blush when the weather turns cool, giving them winter interest in addition to their incredible versatility and hardiness. 

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Reaching about two to three feet tall by three feet wide, wintercreeper adapts well to many different garden situations. If placed near a wall or trellis, its tendril-like new growth will wander upwards, attaching itself to whatever vertical objects are nearby. If left to stand alone, it can be sheared into a neat little hedge. In containers, it fills in beautifully around evergreens, and its red-hued foliage makes it a unique candidate for a holiday pot-up . Once established, it is drought tolerant, making it a wise choice for the California-conscious gardener.  

It's Zella's pick-of-the-week because:

"It's easy to grow and the multi-colored foliage is a nice surprise in the winter."

 

 

Interested in dressing up your garden with low-water gems? Download a list of our favorite drought tolerant plants. 

Drought Tolerant Plants

 

Topics: Winter, Container Ideas, Drought Tolerant, Wintercreeper, Emerald Gaiety, Pot-Ups

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